Search Engine History – Webcrawler

Posted by & filed under Internet History.

WebCrawler went live in the Spring of 1994 and was a Search Engine that originally started off as a research project started at the Universtiy of Washington by Brian Pinkerton. It was bought over in 1995 by AOL and was then bought by Excite.

Search Engine History – The First Search Engine

Posted by & filed under Internet History.

The worlds first Search Engine was created in 1990 by McGill University student Alan Emtage. He named the search engine ‘Archie’, short for Archives due to the limitation of filenames in Unix systems. Before Archie, users shared files and data using an FTP server (File Transfer Protocol). This worked when sharing between small groups of… Read more »

Search Engine History – Bing

Posted by & filed under Internet History.

MSN Search was started in 1998 by the Microsoft Corporation and was one of the first of Microsofts online services. The first incarnation of MSN search displayed search results using information gathered byInktomi and later using a combination of results from both Inktomi and Looksmart (a search advertising and management solutions company). Through time it… Read more »

Search Engine History – Lycos

Posted by & filed under Internet History.

In 1994 Lycos was created by Dr. Michael L. Mauldin and researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University Centre for Machine Translation. In July 1994, Lycos was launched and at that time had an Index of 54,000 web pages and less than a month later 390,000 web pages had been recorded. This number rocketed to over… Read more »

Search Engine History – Inktomi

Posted by & filed under Internet History.

Inktomi was founded in 1996 by Eric Brewer and Paul Gauthier, two students from The University of California. The project was federally funded, encouraging Eric and Paul to reach supercomputing power under microcomputer prices. Inktomi is based in Foster, California with offices across the globe. Inktomi is not a Search Engine site, it provides software… Read more »